Arts

This series is one part of UC Irvine's Musicianship 15 ABC sequence for music majors. An understanding of music notation and basic musical terms is helpful but not required for these presentations. The math involved is basic.

Pitch systems use mathematics to organize audible phenomenon for creative expression. The cognitive processes we develop through exposure to music comprise a kind of applied mathematics; our emotional responses to musical nuance grow out of a largely unconscious mastery of the patterns and structures in music. This series of presentations covers the basic mathematics and cognitive phenomenon found in the tonal system used in Western music and much of the music of the world. Over the course of several presentations we will explore basic concepts of pitch and frequency, the organizing rules of tonal systems, and the mathematical construction of basic scales and chords. The reasoning and purpose of equal temperament, the standard tuning system for tonal music, will be explored in this context. Presentations will include graphics and computer applications designed specifically to illustrate these concepts.

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Biological Sciences

Cell biology, biochemistry, genetics, and the biology of organ systems. Covers concepts of building blocks (nucleotides, amino acids, and cells) and of information flow (DNA to proteins, receptors to nuclei, the blood to distant organs, and DNA to offspring)

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Antibodies, antigens, antigen-antibody reactions, cells and tissues of lymphoreticular and hematopoietic systems, and individual and collective components of cell-mediated and humoral immune response.

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Education

This course is designed to help students understand the aspects of linguistic principles and processes that underlie oral and written language proficiency, and how this knowledge is relevant K-12 instruction.  Emphasis is on a thorough, research-based understanding of phonology, morphology, orthography, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics.  Students learn ways to use this information to support literacy and oral language development for elementary and secondary school students.  Issues of linguistic diversity and second language learning are addressed.

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The research literature on cognitive processes relevant to teaching and learning is vast and fascinating. The purpose of this course is to introduce some of the many theories of learning and related topics useful to the design of instruction and to teaching practice.

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This course is developed to satisfy the California Commission of Teaching Credentialing requirements for teacher candidates.  The class provides opportunities for candidates to learn how to teach the basic and essential fundamentals of physical education for K-6th grade students.  The central knowledge is about children’s motor skill development, along with the emotional and social aspects as they relate to physical activity.  Teachers will learn the key aspects to a physical education lesson, which includes a warm-up activity, the lesson plan (skill development and game applications), and closure.  As a total lesson, at least half the time should be spent in moderate to vigorous activity.

In addition, classroom management techniques, safety and liability, kinesiology, and instructional techniques will be covered.  Moreover, multicultural aspects and special needs populations will be incorporated. Finally, ideas for integrating physical education with academic subjects (math, language arts, science, and social science) will be addressed.

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Engineering

This course covers: Fundamental concepts; fluid statics; fluid dynamics; Bernoulli's equation; control-volume analysis; basic flow equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy; differential analysis; potential flow; viscous incompressible flow.

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This course introduces thermodynamic principles; open and closed systems representative of engineering problems; and first and second law of thermodynamics with applications to engineering systems and design. Topics include: thermodynamic concepts, thermodynamic properties, the first law of thermodynamics, first law analysis for a control volume, the second law of thermodynamics, entropy, and second law analysis for a control volume.

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The main goal of the course is to develop computational programming skills and learn computational tools to be used in the solution of engineering problems. Topics include: Introduction to Computing, Basic Matlab commands, Arrays: one-dimensional and multi-dimensional, Flow control, Selective execution, Repetitive execution and iterations, Input and Output, Modular Programming: Functions, Plotting, and Advanced data types.

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Manufacturing processes can be organized by considering the type of energy required to shape the work-piece. In this course, sources of energy considered for machining are mechanical used for cutting and shaping, heat energy such as in laser cutting, photochemical such as in photolithography, and chemical energy such as in electro chemical machining and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Students, guided by product specifications and a design will decide: 1) When to apply mechanical machining vs. lithography based machining, 2) What type of mechanical machining and what type of lithography based machining to apply, 3) When to employ bottom-up vs. top-down manufacturing, 4) When to choose serial, batch or continuous manufacturing and 5) What rapid prototyping method to select. A logical decision tree will be presented to sort the machining options. Examples from a variety of products ranging in size from nanometers to centimeters will be considered.

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Introduction to computer programming within a numerical computing environment (MATLAB or similar) including types of data representation, graphical display of data, and development of modular programs with application to engineering analysis and problem solving.

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This graduate/undergraduate course by Marc Madou taught at the Technical University of Ulsan introduces engineering and science students to BIOMEMS. After a study of the fundamentals of sensing techniques, various types of biosensors are introduced and the biological principles involved are explained. The course also dedicates several classes to nanomachining and biomimetics.

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Health Sciences

This course presents the overarching framework, principles, and core responsibilities of public health research and practice from a multidisciplinary perspective. The course also provides the necessary foundation for further studies toward advanced cross-cutting approaches essential for public health practice.

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Provides training for students with an interest in clinical and translational research in the health care setting. Cultivates skills for study design, research literature review, ethics, responsible conduct of research, and cultural competence while emphasizing professionalism and personal responsibility.

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This course prrovides direct opportunities for Public Health majors to observe and participate in public health activities and/or research; and to cultivate skills for verbal and written communication of contemporary public health topics for an integrative culminating experience.

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Student participatory course practicing initiation, planning, and coordination of various speakers on the subject of Disparities in Health Care. Topics in this course include: mental health, Health Care financing, religion and spirituality in health, immigration and medical care, women's health, geriatrics, and prison health.

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Introduces the major concepts and principles of public health and the determinants of health status in communities. Emphasizes the ecological model that focuses on the linkages and relationships among multiple natural and social determinants affecting health. Course may be offered online.

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Humanities

In this course we will study ancient Greek religion from Bronze Age to Hellenistic times by investigating relevant literary accounts and the archaeology of the sacred space. The special themes will be festivals and rituals, gender and religion. We will study ancient religion from an anthropological perspective analyzing ritual tradition in its socio-cultural context. The second half of the course will focus on the relation between religion and law, and the regulations that codify religious practice.

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This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to important historical, cultural, literary, and political issues concerning African Americans. Through critical readings of literary, artistic, and filmic texts, this course provides an overview of African American experiences from the 17th through mid-20th centuries. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of the historical and cultural experiences of African Americans from the beginning of the Transatlantic Slave Trade through the Civil Rights Movement. To focus our journey, the course begins with a discussion of the discourse of African American Studies as an academic discipline. Students will proceed to examine the process of forced emigration from Africa, chattel slavery in the British Colonies, the formation of African American identity in the 18th and 19th centuries, and struggles for social transformation and resistance by African Americans in the United States.

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Library

This Science Information tutorial was created to help UCI undergraduate students understand the fundamental processes of knowledge creation and scholarly communication in the basic and applied sciences. The self-paced tutorial uses a series of interactive exercises to illustrate concepts such as the scientific method, peer review, scholarly communication, and methods of locating and evaluating scientific literature and information sources. This tutorial is divided into three sections: (1) Creating, Sharing and Finding Science Information; (2) Science and Engineering Sources and Resources; (3) Reading, Evaluating and Citing Information.

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Physical Sciences

This course is listed as Physics 255: General Relativity in the UCI course catalogue.

An introduction to Einstein’s theory of gravitation. Tensor analysis, Einstein’s field equations, astronomical tests of Einstein’s theory, gravitational waves.


Link to Prof. Hamber's home page: http://aeneas.ps.uci.edu/

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"Cook's Tour" of the universe. Ancient world models. Evidence for universal expansion; the size and age of the universe and how it all began. The long-range future and how to decide the right model. Anthropic principle. Course may be offered online.

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An overview of the scientific quest to discover life elsewhere in the universe. Topics include the origin of life on Earth, Mars, extra-solar planets, interstellar travel, and extra-terrestrial intelligence.

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Please click on the green button to begin course and login as "guest." Have you ever wondered if Superman could really fly? What was Spiderman's spidey sense? How did Wonder Woman's invisible jet work? What does it really mean for something to be a scientific "fact"? Explore how science works and what constitutes "good" science through case studies drawn from a wide spectrum of people's experience, for example superheros, movies, and real world issues such as global warming. The case studies will provide the change to act as science critics as the students develop a better appreciation for science and the scientific method.

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Introduction to basic physics. This course will introduce the conceptual and mathematical framework for kinematics and Newtonian dynamics, and also to teach problem solving techniques that are used in Physics. Other topics include: vectors; motion, force, and energy.

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Second part of the Basic Physics 3 series. This course covers topics such as: fluid mechanics, thermodynamics,electrostatics (including dc circuits), magnetism (including eletromagnetic induction). The course assumes a working knowledge of calculus and trigonometry.

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This class is the third and last of the Physics 3 series. In this class, primarily the course will focus on waves, however, the concepts of force and energy will continue to be important. This course will cover the following topics: Waves and sound; optics; quantum ideas; atomic and nuclear physics; relativity.

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Mathematica and its applications to linear algebra, differential equations, and complex functions. Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Other topics in integral transforms.

Filmed Spring 2014.

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This course will show you how to apply simple physics models to the motion of objects. UCI Physics 7C covers the following topics: force, energy, momentum, rotation, and gravity.

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This course is intended for both mathematics and biology undergrads with a basic mathematics background, and it consists of an introduction to modeling biological problems using continuous ODE methods (rather than discrete methods as used in 113A). We describe the basic qualitative behavior of dynamical systems in the context of a simple population model. As time allows, we will then discuss other types of models such as chemical reactions inside the cell, or excitable systems leading to oscillations and neuronal signals. The necessary linear algebra is also discussed to avoid including additional requirements for this course.

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Introductory course covering basic principles of probability and statistical inference. Topics covered in this course: Axiomatic definition of probability, random variables, probability distributions, expectation.

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Introductory course covering basic principles of probability and statistical inference. Point estimation, interval estimating, and testing hypotheses, Bayesian approaches to inference.

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After reviewing tools from probability, statistics, and elementary differential and partial differential equations, concepts such as hedging, arbitrage, Puts, Calls, the design of portfolios, the derivation and solution of the Blac-Scholes, and other equations are discussed.

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This Pre-Calculus course is designed to prepare students for a calculus course. This course is taught so that students will acquire a solid foundation in algebra and trigonometry. The course concentrates on the various functions that are important to the study of the calculus.

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UCI Math 2A is the first quarter in Single-Variable Calculus and covers the following topics: Introduction to derivatives, calculation of derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions; applications including curve sketching, related rates, and optimization. Exponential and logarithm functions.

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Math 2B is the second quarter of Single-Variable Calculus and covers the following topics: Definite integrals; the fundamental theorem of calculus. Applications of integration including finding areas and volumes. Techniques of integration. Infinite sequences and series. Parametric and polar equations.

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In this course, students will learn basic linear algebra necessary to understand the operations regarding derivatives of functions with more than one variable to investigate maximum and minimum values of those functions with economics applications in mind. Students will also see how to solve linear systems and then how to turn them into problems involving matrices, then learn some of the important properties of matrices. This course will focus on topics in linear algebra and multivariable differential calculus suitable for economic applications. Recorded Summer 2013.

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This course introduces Earth System Science, which, at its core, involves viewing Earth’s environment in a holistic fashion. Topics covered in the course include: the origin and evolution of the Earth, its atmosphere, and oceans, from the perspective of biogeochemical cycles, energy use, and human impacts on the Earth system.

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In recent decades we have observed a significant reduction of the cryosphere due to anthropogenic climate change. The observed and predicted changes in the extent and amount of snow and ice will have major impacts on climate, ecosystems and human populations both at a local and global scale. This course will introduce students to the science behind climate change as well as the physical and chemical processes that govern components of the cryosphere, including snow, permafrost, sea ice, glaciers and ice sheets. Particular emphasis will be placed on the important role that each component plays in the larger climate system and potential feedbacks. We will also examine some of the social, economic and political impacts that the melting cryosphere will have on countries around the Arctic and also worldwide, such as access to new petroleum reserves, infrastructure damage due to melting permafrost, sea level rise and decreases in freshwater availability.

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We will discuss sciences and societal consequences of air pollution problems such as 
  1. Photochemical smog
  2. Atmospheric particle pollution
  3. Indoor pollution
  4. Acid rain 
  5. And human triggered climate change. 
Essential concepts of chemistry, physics, meteorology and mathematics will be introduced. The consequences of air pollution will be discussed in historical and international perspectives. The main educational goal is raising critical thinking skills for the students to develop their own opinions future environmental issues

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Each quarter is devoted to current topics in the field of Earth System Science. Topics addressed vary each quarter. For this course, topics discussed include: climate change, biodiversity, demographics, transportation and urban systems, cost-benefit analysis, negative impacts on the environment, environmental policy, and sustainability.

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The composition and circulation of the atmosphere with a focus on explaining the fundamentals of weather and climate. Topics include solar and terrestrial radiation, clouds, and weather patterns.

Filmed Spring 2014.

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