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Arts

This series is one part of UC Irvine's Musicianship 15 ABC sequence for music majors. An understanding of music notation and basic musical terms is helpful but not required for these presentations. The math involved is basic.

Pitch systems use mathematics to organize audible phenomenon for creative expression. The cognitive processes we develop through exposure to music comprise a kind of applied mathematics; our emotional responses to musical nuance grow out of a largely unconscious mastery of the patterns and structures in music. This series of presentations covers the basic mathematics and cognitive phenomenon found in the tonal system used in Western music and much of the music of the world. Over the course of several presentations we will explore basic concepts of pitch and frequency, the organizing rules of tonal systems, and the mathematical construction of basic scales and chords. The reasoning and purpose of equal temperament, the standard tuning system for tonal music, will be explored in this context. Presentations will include graphics and computer applications designed specifically to illustrate these concepts.

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Biological Sciences

Antibodies, antigens, antigen-antibody reactions, cells and tissues of lymphoreticular and hematopoietic systems, and individual and collective components of cell-mediated and humoral immune response.

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Education

This course is designed to help students understand the aspects of linguistic principles and processes that underlie oral and written language proficiency, and how this knowledge is relevant K-12 instruction.  Emphasis is on a thorough, research-based understanding of phonology, morphology, orthography, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics.  Students learn ways to use this information to support literacy and oral language development for elementary and secondary school students.  Issues of linguistic diversity and second language learning are addressed.

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The research literature on cognitive processes relevant to teaching and learning is vast and fascinating. The purpose of this course is to introduce some of the many theories of learning and related topics useful to the design of instruction and to teaching practice.

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This course is developed to satisfy the California Commission of Teaching Credentialing requirements for teacher candidates.  The class provides opportunities for candidates to learn how to teach the basic and essential fundamentals of physical education for K-6th grade students.  The central knowledge is about children’s motor skill development, along with the emotional and social aspects as they relate to physical activity.  Teachers will learn the key aspects to a physical education lesson, which includes a warm-up activity, the lesson plan (skill development and game applications), and closure.  As a total lesson, at least half the time should be spent in moderate to vigorous activity.

In addition, classroom management techniques, safety and liability, kinesiology, and instructional techniques will be covered.  Moreover, multicultural aspects and special needs populations will be incorporated. Finally, ideas for integrating physical education with academic subjects (math, language arts, science, and social science) will be addressed.

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Engineering

This course covers: Fundamental concepts; fluid statics; fluid dynamics; Bernoulli's equation; control-volume analysis; basic flow equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy; differential analysis; potential flow; viscous incompressible flow.

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This course introduces thermodynamic principles; open and closed systems representative of engineering problems; and first and second law of thermodynamics with applications to engineering systems and design. Topics include: thermodynamic concepts, thermodynamic properties, the first law of thermodynamics, first law analysis for a control volume, the second law of thermodynamics, entropy, and second law analysis for a control volume.

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The main goal of the course is to develop computational programming skills and learn computational tools to be used in the solution of engineering problems. Topics include: Introduction to Computing, Basic Matlab commands, Arrays: one-dimensional and multi-dimensional, Flow control, Selective execution, Repetitive execution and iterations, Input and Output, Modular Programming: Functions, Plotting, and Advanced data types.

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Manufacturing processes can be organized by considering the type of energy required to shape the work-piece. In this course, sources of energy considered for machining are mechanical used for cutting and shaping, heat energy such as in laser cutting, photochemical such as in photolithography, and chemical energy such as in electro chemical machining and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Students, guided by product specifications and a design will decide: 1) When to apply mechanical machining vs. lithography based machining, 2) What type of mechanical machining and what type of lithography based machining to apply, 3) When to employ bottom-up vs. top-down manufacturing, 4) When to choose serial, batch or continuous manufacturing and 5) What rapid prototyping method to select. A logical decision tree will be presented to sort the machining options. Examples from a variety of products ranging in size from nanometers to centimeters will be considered.

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Introduction to computer programming within a numerical computing environment (MATLAB or similar) including types of data representation, graphical display of data, and development of modular programs with application to engineering analysis and problem solving.

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This graduate/undergraduate course by Marc Madou taught at the Technical University of Ulsan introduces engineering and science students to BIOMEMS. After a study of the fundamentals of sensing techniques, various types of biosensors are introduced and the biological principles involved are explained. The course also dedicates several classes to nanomachining and biomimetics.

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Health Sciences

This course presents the overarching framework, principles, and core responsibilities of public health research and practice from a multidisciplinary perspective. The course also provides the necessary foundation for further studies toward advanced cross-cutting approaches essential for public health practice.

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Provides training for students with an interest in clinical and translational research in the health care setting. Cultivates skills for study design, research literature review, ethics, responsible conduct of research, and cultural competence while emphasizing professionalism and personal responsibility.

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This course prrovides direct opportunities for Public Health majors to observe and participate in public health activities and/or research; and to cultivate skills for verbal and written communication of contemporary public health topics for an integrative culminating experience.

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Student participatory course practicing initiation, planning, and coordination of various speakers on the subject of Disparities in Health Care. Topics in this course include: mental health, Health Care financing, religion and spirituality in health, immigration and medical care, women's health, geriatrics, and prison health.

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Introduces the major concepts and principles of public health and the determinants of health status in communities. Emphasizes the ecological model that focuses on the linkages and relationships among multiple natural and social determinants affecting health. Course may be offered online.

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Clinical trials are designed to answer questions concerning the safety and effectiveness of medical products. Get an overview of clinical trials regulated by the FDA. Learn about the planning process underlying the Strategic Clinical Plan and regulatory submissions to the FDA. Explore topics including protocol development and implementation, i.e. study site selection, financial controls, timelines, and management of the site's operations; proper informed consent; Good Clinical Practices compliance; HIPAA; FDA regulations and guidelines; and post-market support studies.

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Learn about the essential elements of Quality System Regulations (QSR's) and Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP's), how there is a commonality between them, and how to develop a global approach to Quality Systems in order to satisfy international requirements of ISO 9001:2000 and ISO 13485:2003. A detailed analysis of these systems and practical 'how to' recommendations and approaches are presented, with particular emphasis on the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) QSR's and GMP's.


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This course presents a detailed overview of the regulatory requirements for the development and manufacture of pharmaceutical products. Individuals involved in manufacturing, quality control, research and development, and clinical studies will learn the latest information. Explore topics that include the product development process through commercialization; product characterization and pre-clinical evaluation; pharmaceutical industry requirements; clinical trial requirements, good manufacturing practices (GMPs); good laboratory practices (GLPs); FDA inspections, labeling, and advertising of medical products; and preparing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) submissions.

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Humanities

In this course we will study ancient Greek religion from Bronze Age to Hellenistic times by investigating relevant literary accounts and the archaeology of the sacred space. The special themes will be festivals and rituals, gender and religion. We will study ancient religion from an anthropological perspective analyzing ritual tradition in its socio-cultural context. The second half of the course will focus on the relation between religion and law, and the regulations that codify religious practice.

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This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to important historical, cultural, literary, and political issues concerning African Americans. Through critical readings of literary, artistic, and filmic texts, this course provides an overview of African American experiences from the 17th through mid-20th centuries. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of the historical and cultural experiences of African Americans from the beginning of the Transatlantic Slave Trade through the Civil Rights Movement. To focus our journey, the course begins with a discussion of the discourse of African American Studies as an academic discipline. Students will proceed to examine the process of forced emigration from Africa, chattel slavery in the British Colonies, the formation of African American identity in the 18th and 19th centuries, and struggles for social transformation and resistance by African Americans in the United States.

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Library

This Science Information tutorial was created to help UCI undergraduate students understand the fundamental processes of knowledge creation and scholarly communication in the basic and applied sciences. The self-paced tutorial uses a series of interactive exercises to illustrate concepts such as the scientific method, peer review, scholarly communication, and methods of locating and evaluating scientific literature and information sources. This tutorial is divided into three sections: (1) Creating, Sharing and Finding Science Information; (2) Science and Engineering Sources and Resources; (3) Reading, Evaluating and Citing Information.

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Physical Sciences

This course is listed as Physics 255: General Relativity in the UCI course catalogue.

An introduction to Einstein’s theory of gravitation. Tensor analysis, Einstein’s field equations, astronomical tests of Einstein’s theory, gravitational waves.


Link to Prof. Hamber's home page: http://aeneas.ps.uci.edu/

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"Cook's Tour" of the universe. Ancient world models. Evidence for universal expansion; the size and age of the universe and how it all began. The long-range future and how to decide the right model. Anthropic principle. Course may be offered online.

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Please click on the green button to begin course and login as "guest." Have you ever wondered if Superman could really fly? What was Spiderman's spidey sense? How did Wonder Woman's invisible jet work? What does it really mean for something to be a scientific "fact"? Explore how science works and what constitutes "good" science through case studies drawn from a wide spectrum of people's experience, for example superheros, movies, and real world issues such as global warming. The case studies will provide the change to act as science critics as the students develop a better appreciation for science and the scientific method.

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Introduction to basic physics. This course will introduce the conceptual and mathematical framework for kinematics and Newtonian dynamics, and also to teach problem solving techniques that are used in Physics. Other topics include: vectors; motion, force, and energy.

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Second part of the Basic Physics 3 series. This course covers topics such as: fluid mechanics, thermodynamics,electrostatics (including dc circuits), magnetism (including eletromagnetic induction). The course assumes a working knowledge of calculus and trigonometry.

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This class is the third and last of the Physics 3 series. In this class, primarily the course will focus on waves, however, the concepts of force and energy will continue to be important. This course will cover the following topics: Waves and sound; optics; quantum ideas; atomic and nuclear physics; relativity.

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Mathematica and its applications to linear algebra, differential equations, and complex functions. Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Other topics in integral transforms.

Filmed Spring 2014.

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This course will show you how to apply simple physics models to the motion of objects. UCI Physics 7C covers the following topics: force, energy, momentum, rotation, and gravity.

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This course is intended for both mathematics and biology undergrads with a basic mathematics background, and it consists of an introduction to modeling biological problems using continuous ODE methods (rather than discrete methods as used in 113A). We describe the basic qualitative behavior of dynamical systems in the context of a simple population model. As time allows, we will then discuss other types of models such as chemical reactions inside the cell, or excitable systems leading to oscillations and neuronal signals. The necessary linear algebra is also discussed to avoid including additional requirements for this course.

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Introductory course covering basic principles of probability and statistical inference. Topics covered in this course: Axiomatic definition of probability, random variables, probability distributions, expectation.

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Introductory course covering basic principles of probability and statistical inference. Point estimation, interval estimating, and testing hypotheses, Bayesian approaches to inference.

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After reviewing tools from probability, statistics, and elementary differential and partial differential equations, concepts such as hedging, arbitrage, Puts, Calls, the design of portfolios, the derivation and solution of the Blac-Scholes, and other equations are discussed.

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This Pre-Calculus course is designed to prepare students for a calculus course. This course is taught so that students will acquire a solid foundation in algebra and trigonometry. The course concentrates on the various functions that are important to the study of the calculus.

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UCI Math 2A is the first quarter in Single-Variable Calculus and covers the following topics: Introduction to derivatives, calculation of derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions; applications including curve sketching, related rates, and optimization. Exponential and logarithm functions.

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Math 2B is the second quarter of Single-Variable Calculus and covers the following topics: Definite integrals; the fundamental theorem of calculus. Applications of integration including finding areas and volumes. Techniques of integration. Infinite sequences and series. Parametric and polar equations.

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In this course, students will learn basic linear algebra necessary to understand the operations regarding derivatives of functions with more than one variable to investigate maximum and minimum values of those functions with economics applications in mind. Students will also see how to solve linear systems and then how to turn them into problems involving matrices, then learn some of the important properties of matrices. This course will focus on topics in linear algebra and multivariable differential calculus suitable for economic applications. Recorded Summer 2013.

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This course introduces Earth System Science, which, at its core, involves viewing Earth’s environment in a holistic fashion. Topics covered in the course include: the origin and evolution of the Earth, its atmosphere, and oceans, from the perspective of biogeochemical cycles, energy use, and human impacts on the Earth system.

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In recent decades we have observed a significant reduction of the cryosphere due to anthropogenic climate change. The observed and predicted changes in the extent and amount of snow and ice will have major impacts on climate, ecosystems and human populations both at a local and global scale. This course will introduce students to the science behind climate change as well as the physical and chemical processes that govern components of the cryosphere, including snow, permafrost, sea ice, glaciers and ice sheets. Particular emphasis will be placed on the important role that each component plays in the larger climate system and potential feedbacks. We will also examine some of the social, economic and political impacts that the melting cryosphere will have on countries around the Arctic and also worldwide, such as access to new petroleum reserves, infrastructure damage due to melting permafrost, sea level rise and decreases in freshwater availability.

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We will discuss sciences and societal consequences of air pollution problems such as 
  1. Photochemical smog
  2. Atmospheric particle pollution
  3. Indoor pollution
  4. Acid rain 
  5. And human triggered climate change. 
Essential concepts of chemistry, physics, meteorology and mathematics will be introduced. The consequences of air pollution will be discussed in historical and international perspectives. The main educational goal is raising critical thinking skills for the students to develop their own opinions future environmental issues

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Each quarter is devoted to current topics in the field of Earth System Science. Topics addressed vary each quarter. For this course, topics discussed include: climate change, biodiversity, demographics, transportation and urban systems, cost-benefit analysis, negative impacts on the environment, environmental policy, and sustainability.

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The composition and circulation of the atmosphere with a focus on explaining the fundamentals of weather and climate. Topics include solar and terrestrial radiation, clouds, and weather patterns.

Filmed Spring 2014.

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Introduction to the basic principles of chemical biology: structures and reactivity; chemical mechanisms of enzyme catalysis; chemistry of signaling, biosynthesis, and metabolic pathways.

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This course provides an introduction to quantum mechanics and principles of quantum chemistry with applications to nuclear motions and the electronic structure of the hydrogen atom. It also examines the Schrödinger equation and study how it describes the behavior of very light particles, the quantum description of rotating and vibrating molecules is compared to the classical description, and the quantum description of the electronic structure of atoms is studied.

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Principles of quantum mechanics with application to the elements of atomic structure and energy levels, diatomic molecular spectroscopy and structure determination, and chemical bonding in simple molecules.

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In Chemistry 131C, students will study how to calculate macroscopic chemical properties of systems. This course will build on the microscopic understanding (Chemical Physics) to reinforce and expand your understanding of the basic thermo-chemistry concepts from General Chemistry (Physical Chemistry.) We then go on to study how chemical reaction rates are measured and calculated from molecular properties. Topics covered include: Energy, entropy, and the thermodynamic potentials; Chemical equilibrium; and Chemical kinetics.

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Chem 1A is the first quarter of General Chemistry and covers the following topics: atomic structure; general properties of the elements; covalent, ionic, and metallic bonding; intermolecular forces; mass relationships.

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Chem 1B is the second quarter of General Chemistry and covers the following topics: properties of gases, liquids, solids; changes of state; properties of solutions; stoichiometry; thermochemistry; and thermodynamics.

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Topics covered include equilibria, aqueous acid-base equilibria, solubility equilibria, oxidation reduction reactions, electrochemistry; kinetics; special topics.

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Preparatory course for general chemistry.

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Advanced treatment of basic mechanistic principles of modern organic chemistry. Topics include molecular orbital theory, orbital symmetry control of organic reactions, aromaticity, carbonium ion chemistry, free radical chemistry, the chemistry of carbenes and carbanions, photochemistry, electrophilic substitutions, aromatic chemistry.

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These videos are part of a 23-lecture graduate-level course titled "Organic Reaction Mechanisms II" taught at UC Irvine by Professor David Van Vranken. Topics include more in-depth treatment of mechanistic concepts, kinetics, conformational analysis, computational methods, stereoelectronics, and both solution and enzymatic catalysis.

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Graduate course in organic spectroscopy. Modern methods used in structure determination of organic molecules. Topics include mass spectrometry; ultraviolet, chiroptical, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

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Fundamental concepts relating to carbon compounds with emphasis on structural theory and the nature of chemical bonding, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, and spectroscopic, physical, and chemical properties of the principal classes of carbon compounds.

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This is the second quarter of the organic chemistry series. Topics covered include: Fundamental concepts relating to carbon compounds with emphasis on structural theory and the nature of chemical bonding, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, and spectroscopic, physical, and chemical properties of the principal classes of carbon compounds.

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This is the third quarter course in the organic chemistry series. Topics covered include: Fundamental concepts relating to carbon compounds with emphasis on structural theory and the nature of chemical bonding, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, and spectroscopic, physical, and chemical properties of the principal classes of carbon compounds.

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This course introduces students to the personal computing software used by chemists for managing and processing of data sets, plotting of graphs, symbolic and numerical manipulation of mathematical equations, and representing chemical reactions and chemical formulas.

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Social Ecology

This entry-level psychology course is designed to provide students with an in-depth survey of general psychology. Topics include biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, cognition, development, personality, psychopathology, and social psychology

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The purpose of this course is to investigate the challenges of implementing sustainability in a variety of contexts from the perspectives of climate change, energy use, natural resource use, and ecosystems/land use. While we are doing this through lectures and discussions, students will be carrying out individual and team research projects that involve applying the logic of sustainable design. This year’s theme for the research projects is “climate sensitive sustainable design.”

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Water is the economic, social, and physical lifeblood of humanity, providing the bases for agriculture, industry, transportation, energy production, and life itself. Despite its importance, alarming signs suggest that there are looming threats to this vital resource. The World Resources Institute contends that the world's thirst for water is likely to become one of the most pressing issues this century due to population growth, drought, and climate change. The World Bank reports that many developing nations already face a crisis from intensive irrigation, urbanization, diminishing supplies, and deteriorating infrastructure; and, UNESCO predicts as many as 7 billion people in half the world’s countries will face shortages of potable water by 2050.

The purpose of this course is to illuminate how water is a political, social, economic, and environmental challenge and to suggest ways we might manage it better and more equitably. You will be provided basic knowledge about physical aspects of water supply and quality; the evolution of water policy throughout history – and in different societies; the importance of water to human and ecological health; the role of law, politics, and markets in its allocation, regulation, and protection; and, the importance of ethics to its equitable provision. The focus of this course is competition for water, and the impacts of this competition on available supply and quality – from a global perspective. Disputes over water are not limited to less developed countries. Such conflicts are growing across the U.S., especially in the West, and in California – where water management has long been a focal point of contention.

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How are people affected by overcrowding, traffic congestion, and noise? Why do people litter or vandalize their environments? How do buildings affect their occupants? Does the architectural design of apartment buildings influence patterns of neighboring and friendship formation? Why do people consume scarce environmental resources? Can residential, work, and neighborhood settings be designed to reduce stress, increase productivity, and promote physical activity? These are some of the questions that have concerned environmental psychologists.

Environmental psychology is the study of human behavior and well-being in relation to the large-scale, sociophysical environment. The term, large-scale environment, refers to places such as homes, offices, neighborhoods, and whole communities. These places can be described in terms of several physical and social dimensions, including their geographical location, architectural design, membership and social organization. The term, sociophysical environment, reflects the assumption that the physical and social dimensions of places are closely intertwined. The architectural design of a housing complex, for example, can exert a subtle but substantial impact on the friendship patterns that develop among residents. This course emphasizes the interdependence between physical and social aspects of places, rather than viewing these dimensions as separate and isolated.

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Public policy investigates what government does or, in other words, the outcomes of decisions made at local, regional, national, and international levels of governance - as well as the consequences they bring about. We explore three central, interrelated questions regarding the nature of governmental decision-making processes having as their aim the enactment, implementation, and evaluation of public policy. These are: 1) what frameworks, explanatory theories, and ways of knowing illuminate how and why certain types of policies get made? 2) What is the role of the policy analyst - an academically trained professional - in describing, understanding, predicting, and designing policies? And, 3) what are the consequences of different policy designs on: public welfare and well-being, other areas of social discourse and interaction, and the concept of democracy itself?

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Examines the causes and consequences of hate crimes as well as the larger soical land political context in which they occur. Considers the dynamics and politics of violence stemming from bigotry and discrimination, as well as the social policies designed to control it.

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Examines criminal activity within the professions, organizations, and businesses. Theories discussing the etiology of these acts are considered as well as perspectives regarding their control.

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Social Sciences

At the dawn of the twenty-first century, globalization is a pervasive feature of social life. The clichéd examples – from McDonald’s to reggae music – form just the tip of the globalization iceberg. A world economy, a world polity, and a world culture are all undergoing rapid expansion. In this course, we will consider globalization’s aspects and impacts, in an effort to develop some understandings of its causes, effects, and implications for your own life.

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Political Science 126A, Mexican-Americans & Politics also cross listed as Chicano/Latino Studies 143, Mexican-Americans & Politics This course examines the role of Mexican American and other Latino communities in shaping state and national politics in the United States. After we review the political history and political organizational strategies of Mexican Americans, we will examine their contemporary modes of political organization; analyze public policy issues that concern them; evaluate the successes and failures of Mexican American empowerment strategies; and measure the electoral impact of Mexican American votes.

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Political Science 126C, US Immigration Policy, also cross listed as Chicano/Latino Studies 163, US immigration Policy. The United States is in the middle of a national debate over immigration policy and the outcomes of immigrant incorporation. The debate is not just taking place in the U.S. Congress, which has the power and responsibility to shape policy, but also in national politics, in state legislatures, and in community organizing. In some form, the current debate began in the early 1990s, but has achieved a new urgency in the last several years. Congress has debated significant legislative changes to immigration policy in 2005, 2006, and 2007, but these debates ended inconclusively which had the effect of raising even more the salience of immigration as a policy issue in the public’s mind. Congress will likely again debate immigration reform in 2009. Our goal in this class is to analyze what it will take for Congress to craft a “comprehensive” immigration reform. Although the need for comprehensive reform is debated (the status quo works for many in the society), the high level of popular dissatisfaction with current policies, the pressures put on the nation by demands for immigrant labor, and the high number of unauthorized migrants resident in the United States demonstrate the need for a thorough review of current policies.

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This course analyzes the strategies used by Latinos to influence outcomes in the 2008 Elections as well as efforts by candidates, campaigns, and political parties to mobilize Latino voters. We will use 2008 as a case study to analyze the broader influence of Latinos on U.S. electoral politics and to evaluate how the structure of contemporary U.S. elections benefits cohesive electorates and disadvantages more marginalized populations. The class will be organized around three broad themes. First, we will evaluate the influence of Latinos in recent elections. Second, we will analyze how electoral systems and structures create opportunities and barriers to Latino participation. Finally, we will assess how candidates understand the Latino electorate and shape their campaign structures and messages to reach out to Latinos.

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Political Science 61A, Minority Politics, also cross listed as Chicano/Latino Studies 64, Minority Politics. The course’s focus is the politics and experiences of specific groups: African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian Americans. This examination and analysis will not only enhance our understanding of these groups’ political roles, but will demonstrate that the U.S. political system cannot be adequately understood without understanding the political dynamics of ethnicity and race.

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International Studies 12: Global Issues & Institutions cross listed as Political Science 44A: Global Issues and Institutions. Global Issues and Institutions is an introductory survey course designed to introduce the students to numerous current issues confronting policy-makers, pundits, and concerned global citizens as well as to the international institutions that regularly cope with those same issues. Among the issues discussed are the following: nuclear politics, energy crisis, war, international terrorism, globalization, ethnic conflict, environmental degradation, development, debt, and dependence. At the end of the quarter students will be able to: (a) identify and describe some major political, economic, social, and environmental issues confronting the global community; (b) evaluate major threats to peace and stability in the world today; (c) understand the role of power and military force in global affairs and limitations to the use of force; and (d) evaluate the demographic, economic, and national aspects of development.

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International Studies 164: Iraq Reconstruction cross listed as Political Science 159: Iraq Reconstruction Iraq is an in-conflict country. Its people live under foreign occupation and experience daily confrontations and hostilities. The country is politically unstable, nationally fragmented, and deeply divided along sectarian lines. The involvement of Iraq in several wars since 1979, thirteen years of international sanctions, and its occupation by the U.S. and its allies since April 2003 have left a physically ravaged and socially fragmented country. In this context, Iraq represents in-conflict countries such as Afghanistan, where conflict prevails and determines the social, political, and economic life of the country and its people. The main objectives of this course are as follows: To provide a brief political history of Iraq; To analyze the prospects of Iraq’s economic development; To discuss the effects of external interventions on Iraqi society; To offer students theoretical and practical tools to understand the politics behind grand projects of post-conflict and in-conflict countries reconstructing and nation-building; To present and discuss in depth diverse perspectives on the reconstruction of Iraq through a variety of lenses.

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This entry-level psychology course is designed to provide students with an in-depth survey of general psychology. Topics include biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, cognition, development, personality, psychopathology, and social psychology

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This course is an anthropological exploration of religions in diverse cultural and historical contexts. Our focus will be on relations of power, social order, social change, gender, and the role that religion plays in modernity, transnationalism, and globalization. We will investigate the performance of rites and rituals, and the cultural expressions of religious beliefs and practices. Through comparative and critical strategies, we will look at how religion interacts with, and is embedded in other aspects of society. In doing so, we will find religious elements in unexpected places. We will study anthropological theories of culture and religion from the classical canon, in addition to contemporary approaches, and apply them to a variety of topics. While respecting the efficacy of all systems of belief, we will think about how religions orient people to their social worlds in ways that are systematically related to historical and cultural change.

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The development of genomics, stem-cell research, robotics, nanotechnology, and neuropharmacology raises difficult religious and philosophical questions. Examines interdisciplinary approaches that cut across institutional boundaries, cultural borders, and religious traditions. Focuses on the relationship between religion and cognitive/affective/social neuroscience. Same as Logic and Philosophy of Science 140A-B.

Note: To access course, when in the UCI Distance Learning website, please click on "Login as Guest" button.

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University Extension

This course is designed to give people new to the business analyst role or those who supervise business analysts a basic understanding of the functions and business impact of this role. The course provides a special focus on business analysis functions as they relate to the development of information technology solutions and the business analysis project life cycle. Course topics include the role of the business analyst, gathering and documenting user requirements, modeling the business, business case analysis, process modeling, quality management and testing.

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This course is not intended to replace the professional financial planner, but to help to make the general public better consumers of financial planning advice. The course was created to help those who cannot afford extensive planning assistance better understand how to define and reach their financial goals. It provides basic understanding so informed decisions can be made. The course can also be seen as a reference for individual topics that are part of personal financial planning.

Financial planning, in the broadest sense, is an effort to manage all aspects of a person / family’s financial affairs. Classically, that begins with planning family spending and extends through risk management (insurance), taxes, wealth accumulation, investing, and wealth distribution (retirement and estate planning).

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This module is the introduction to the University Extension online course, Introduction to Project Management. Project management has been proven to be the most effective method of delivering products within cost, schedule, and resource constraints. This intensive and hands-on course gives you the skills to ensure your projects are completed on time and on budget while giving the user the product they expect. You will gain a strong working knowledge of the basics of project management and be able to immediately use that knowledge to effectively manage work projects. At the end of the course you will be able to identify and manage the product scope, build a work breakdown structure, create a project plan, create the project budget, define and allocate resources, manage the project development, identify and manage risks, and understand the project procurement process.

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Con este curso no se pretende reemplazar al planificador financiero profesional, sino ayudar a que el público en general se convierta en un mejor consumidor del asesoramiento en la planificación financiera. El curso fue creado con el fin de ayudar a aquellas personas que no pueden pagar una asistencia de planificación extensa, a comprender mejor cómo definir y alcanzar sus metas financieras. El mismo, ofrece una comprensión básica para tomar decisiones mejor fundamentadas. Asimismo, el curso se puede considerar como una referencia de temas individuales que forman parte de la planificación financiera personal. La planificación financiera, en su definición más amplia, es un esfuerzo por gestionar todos los aspectos de los temas financieros de una persona o una familia. Generalmente, esto comienza con la planificación de los gastos de la familia y se prolonga hasta la gestión de riesgos (seguro), impuestos, acumulación de riqueza, inversiones, y distribución de la riqueza (jubilación y planificación sucesoria).

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Gain an understanding of the general operational and administrative procedures in spas, private clubs and the hospitality industry. You'll develop an understanding of unique sensitivities required in managing and operating in the increasingly lucrative and complex spa industry. Other topics include: business planning, marketing, licensures, compensation models, legal and ethical issues governing club, hospitality and spa projects, insurance issues, technical issues, billing, inventory control, client file management, privacy issues and the development of standard operating procedures. You'll also learn the guidelines for optimizing energy efficiency in facility operations including design, energy, and water and waste management issues.

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Acquire the information and experience you need to identify your organization's training and development needs and master the processes necessary to develop, implement and evaluate effective training programs. You will gain an understanding of your role and responsibilities as a trainer, as well as the practical hands- on knowledge needed to implement a successful program through lectures, classroom discussions, and developing and presenting an actual training session in class. This course is excellent for training and human resources specialists as well as operating managers with significant human resources development responsibilities.

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Learn about the essential elements of Quality System Regulations (QSR's) and Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP's), how there is a commonality between them, and how to develop a global approach to Quality Systems in order to satisfy international requirements of ISO 9001:2000 and ISO 13485:2003. A detailed analysis of these systems and practical 'how to' recommendations and approaches are presented, with particular emphasis on the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) QSR's and GMP's.


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This course presents a detailed overview of the regulatory requirements for the development and manufacture of pharmaceutical products. Individuals involved in manufacturing, quality control, research and development, and clinical studies will learn the latest information. Explore topics that include the product development process through commercialization; product characterization and pre-clinical evaluation; pharmaceutical industry requirements; clinical trial requirements, good manufacturing practices (GMPs); good laboratory practices (GLPs); FDA inspections, labeling, and advertising of medical products; and preparing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) submissions.

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This is the introduction module covering technical requirements, such as the recommended use of the Firefox browser, and how to take the course. This course is based on a self-diagnostic approach, using sample questions, guided examples, brief topical coverage, and final diagnostic questions. It is designed for rapid study for those prospective or current teachers taking the California Subject Exam for Teachers (CSET).

For future reference, please go to and bookmark this page: CSET Mathematics I: Course Introduction.

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  • This module covers why graphs of linear inequalities are half planes and helps yoo to apply this fact (e.g., linear programming). For the exam, you should be able to prove and use the following:
  1. The Rational Root Theorem for polynomials with integer coefficients
  2. The Factor Theorem
  3. The Conjugate Roots Theorem for polynomial equations with real coefficients
  4. The Quadratic Formula for real and complex quadratic polynomials
  5. The Binomial Theorem

For future reference, please visit and bookmark this page: CSET Mathematics Subtest I: Polynomial Equations and Inequalities.

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The University of California, Irvine Extension, supported by generous grants from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and The Boeing Company, is developing online courses to prepare science and mathematics teachers for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET). The courses address the urgent need to help teachers prepare for and pass the CSET exams necessary to teach science and mathematics in California Schools. UC Irvine Extension's online test-preparation courses correspond with the 10 CSET science subtests and three CSET mathematics subtests.

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This module covers why the real and complex numbers are each a field, and that particular rings are not fields (e.g. integers, polynomial rings, matrix rings).

  • You will apply basic properties of real and complex numbers in constructing mathematical arguments (e.g. if a < b and c < 0, then ac > bc). You will also demonstrate your knowledge that rational numbers and real numbers can be ordered and that the complex numbers cannot be ordered, but that any polynomial equation with real coefficients can be solved in the complex field. 

For future reference, please visit and bookmark this page: CSET Subtest Mathematics I: Algebraic Structures.

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The University of California, Irvine Extension, supported by generous grants from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and The Boeing Company, is developing online courses to prepare science and mathematics teachers for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET). The courses address the urgent need to help teachers prepare for and pass the CSET exams necessary to teach science and mathematics in California Schools. UC Irvine Extension's online test-preparation courses correspond with the 10 CSET science subtests and three CSET mathematics subtests.

Start Course Course Information

The University of California, Irvine Extension, supported by generous grants from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and The Boeing Company, is developing online courses to prepare science and mathematics teachers for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET). The courses address the urgent need to help teachers prepare for and pass the CSET exams necessary to teach science and mathematics in California Schools. UC Irvine Extension's online test-preparation courses correspond with the 10 CSET science subtests and three CSET mathematics subtests. The modules covered in this test-preparation course are Trigonometry, Limits and Continuity, Derivatives and Applications, Integrals and Applications, and Sequences and Series.

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The University of California, Irvine Extension, supported by generous grants from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and The Boeing Company, is developing online courses to prepare science and mathematics teachers for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET). This module is part of the preparation for CSET Science Subtest I. It covers fifteen (15) topics in Astronomy: 1. The Stars 2. Phases of the Moon 3. The Solar System 4. Formation of the Solar System 5. Astronomical Distance Measurement 6. Evidence for Planets Around Other Stars 7. Characteristics of Galaxies 8. Our Place in the Milky Way 9. Star Color, Temperature, Size, and Luminosity 10. Fusion in Stars 11. Stellar Balance and Evolution 12. Distinguishing Stars from Planets 13. Accelerators in Astronomical Research 14. Astronomical Instruments 15. Additional Material

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The University of California, Irvine Extension, supported by generous grants from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and The Boeing Company, is developing online courses to prepare science and mathematics teachers for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET). This module is part of the preparation for CSET Science Subtest I. It covers:
  1. Tectonic Processes I: Continental Drift
  2. Tectonic Processes II: Seafloor Spreading and Plate Tectonics
  3. Tectonic Processes III: Thermal Processes
  4. Tectonic Processes IV: Types of Plate Boundaries
  5. Tectonic Processes V: Volcanoes, Earthquakes, and Earth Resource
  6. Tectonic Processes VI: Earthquake Processes and Their Roles
  7. Rock Formation I: The Rock Cycle
  8. Rock Formation II: Relative and Absolute Dating
  9. Rock Formation III: Uniformitarianism and Catastrophism
  10. Earth's Surface I: Erosion, Deposition, and Transport
  11. Earth's Surface II: Coastal Processes
  12. Earth's Surface III: Natural Hazards
  13. Energy in the Earth System: The Water Cycle
  14. Energy in the Earth System: Changes in the Sky
  15. Energy in the Earth System: Heating of the Earth by the Sun
  16. Energy in the Earth System: Air Movements' Effect on Weather
  17. Energy in the Earth System: Energy Transfer Processes
  18. Energy in the Earth System: Predicting Weather Patterns.

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The University of California, Irvine Extension, supported by generous grants from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and The Boeing Company, is developing online courses to prepare science and mathematics teachers for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET). This module is part of the preparation for CSET Science Subtest I. It covers: (1) California's Fresh Water; (2) Fossil Fuels; (3) Energy from Nuclear Reactors; (4) Renewable Sources of Energy; (5) Recycling; and (6) California's Major Natural Resources.

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The University of California, Irvine Extension, supported by generous grants from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and The Boeing Company, is developing online courses to prepare science and mathematics teachers for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET). This module is part of the preparation for CSET Science Subtest I. It covers: 1. Magnetism 2. Building a Simple Compass 3. Electrostatics 4. Introduction to Circuits 5. Energy in Electrical Circuits 6. Measuring Voltage, Current, Resistance, and Capacitance 7. Ohms Law 8. Calculating Voltage, Current, and Resistance 9. Power 10. Electromagnets

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The University of California, Irvine Extension, supported by generous grants from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and The Boeing Company, is developing online courses to prepare science and mathematics teachers for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET). This module is part of the preparation for CSET Science Subtest I. It covers: 1. Position and Displacement 2. Speed and Velocity 3. Acceleration 4. Graphing Motion 5. Isaac Newton 6. Newtons First Law and the Concept of Force 7. Newtons Second Law 8. Types of Forces 9. Newtons Third Law 10. Gravity and Circular Motion 11. Levers and Other Simple Machines 12. Biophysics: Levers in the Human Body 13. Fluids and Fluid Dynamics

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The University of California, Irvine Extension, supported by generous grants from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and The Boeing Company, is developing online courses to prepare science and mathematics teachers for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET). This module is part of the preparation for CSET Science Subtest I. It covers: 1. How We See 2. Types of Waves 3. Wave Calculations 4. Reflection 5. Superposition, Standing Waves, and Beats 6. Diffraction and Youngs Double Slit Experiment 7. The Doppler Effect and Polarization 8. Refraction 9. Lenses

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The University of California, Irvine Extension, supported by generous grants from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and The Boeing Company, is developing online courses to prepare science and mathematics teachers for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET). This module is part of the preparation for CSET Science Subtest II. The Ecology module includes: Introduction to Ecology, Energy Flow in an Ecosystem, Biogeochemical Cycles in Ecosystems, Abiotic and Biotic Factors in an Ecosystem, The Roles of Photosynthesis and Respiration in an Ecosystem, Interactions Within and Among Ecosystems, Factors that Affect Population Size, Summary, Practice Questions, and CSET Review Questionnaire.

Be sure to check out How to Take This Course.

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The University of California, Irvine Extension, supported by generous grants from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and The Boeing Company, is developing online courses to prepare science and mathematics teachers for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET). This module is part of the preparation for CSET Science Subtest II. The Genetics and Evolution module includes the following topics: Inheritance of Traits, Mono and Dihybrid Crosses, Sexual vs. Asexual Reproduction, Coding of DNA, DNA Replication, What is Evolution?, Theory of Natural Selection, and Events Affecting Evolution. This resource uses the methodology of trying to assist you with your own specific needs. Be sure to check out How to Take This Course for a full understanding of the proper use of this resource.

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The University of California, Irvine Extension, supported by generous grants from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and The Boeing Company, is developing online courses to prepare science and mathematics teachers for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET). This module is part of the preparation for CSET Science Subtest II.

This module includes the following chemistry topics:

  • History of Thermodynamics
  • Conservation of Energy
  • Heat Transfer and Changes in Temperature
  • Conduction, Convection, & Radiation
  • How Chemical Energy in Fuel is Transformed into Heat
  • Physical vs. Chemical Changes

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The University of California, Irvine Extension, supported by generous grants from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and The Boeing Company, is developing online courses to prepare science and mathematics teachers for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET). This module is part of the preparation for CSET Science Subtest II.

This module includes the following chemistry topics:
  • Chemical Compounds Found in Living Organisms
  • Structure and Function of Molecules in Living Organisms
  • What is Protein and how is it Made?
  • Respiration
  • Photosynthesis

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The University of California, Irvine Extension, supported by generous grants from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and The Boeing Company, is developing online courses to prepare science and mathematics teachers for the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET). This module is part of the preparation for CSET Science Subtest II.

This module includes the following chemistry topics:
  • Atoms and Isotopes
  • Atoms, Molecules, Elements, Compounds, Mixtures
  • States of Matter
  • Physical Properties of Matter
  • Unique Physical Properties of Chemical Substances
  • Chemical Changes
  • Acids and Bases
  • The Periodic Table
  • Position in the Periodic Table
  • Organic and Inorganic Compounds
  • The Role of Carbon

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